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Osteoporosis is a disease of bone that leads to an increased risk of fracture. In osteoporosis the bone mineral density (BMD) is reduced, bone microarchitecture is disrupted, and the amount and variety of non-collagenous proteins in bone is altered. Osteoporosis is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) in women as a bone mineral density 2.5 standard deviations below peak bone mass (20-year-old healthy female average) as measured by DXA; the term "established osteoporosis" includes the presence of a fragility fracture. Osteoporosis is most common in women after menopause, when it is called postmenopausal osteoporosis, but may also develop in men, and may occur in anyone in the presence of particular hormonal disorders and other chronic diseases or as a result of medications, specifically glucocorticoids, when the disease is called steroid- or glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (SIOP or GIOP). Given its influence is the risk of fragility fracture, osteoporosis may significantly affect life expectancy and quality of life.

CauseEdit

Osteoporosis is caused by factors related to both lifestyle and dietary choices. Smoking enhances the risk of osteoporosis, as does a non-active lifestyle; as with many bodily functions bones simply degrade when under-used. Several factors in the diet may contribute to the disease; an excessive intake of protein, an elevated intake of phosphate (from meat or soft drinks), an elevated intake of sugar (especially from processed foods) and a low intake of nutrients.[1]

PreventionEdit

Osteoporosis can be prevented with lifestyle changes and sometimes medication; in people with osteoporosis, treatment may involve both. Lifestyle change includes preventing falls and exercise; medication includes calcium, vitamin D, bisphosphonates and several others. Fall-prevention advice includes exercise to tone deambulatory muscles, proprioception-improvement exercises; equilibrium therapies may be included. Exercise with its anabolic effect, may at the same time stop or reverse osteoporosis.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Askew, G. & Paquette, J. (2007) (in english). Secrets of Supplements (1st ed.). PhyteMedia. p. 20, 23. ISBN 978-0-9784290-0-3. http://www.phytemedia.com. 
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